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Discussion Starter #1
So I have:

2WD
4WD Low
4WD Lock

No 4WD High.

Is it safe to run 4WD Lock in the rain or will that stress the system ? Not really sure what the lock means, have to see if I can find info on Mopar site, or maybe in the manual.
 

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Here's from the guide.

2WD Rear-Wheel Drive High Range — This range is for normal street and highway driving on dry hard surfaced roads.

4WD LOCK Four-Wheel Drive Lock High Range — This range maximizes torque to the front driveshaft, forcing the front and rear wheels to rotate at the same speed. Additional traction for loose, slippery road surfaces only.

4WD LOW Four-Wheel Drive Low Range — This range provides low speed four-wheel drive. It maximizes torque to the front driveshaft, forcing the front and rear wheels to rotate at the same speed. This range provides additional traction and maximum pulling power for loose, slippery road surfaces only. Do not exceed 25 mph (40 km/h).

NEUTRAL (N) Neutral — This range disengages both the front and rear driveshafts from the powertrain. To be used for flat towing behind another vehicle. Refer to “Recreational Towing” in “Starting And Operating” in your Owner’s Manual located on the DVD for further information. This electronically shifted transfer case is designed to be driven in the two–wheel drive position (2WD) for normal street and highway conditions on dry hard surfaced roads). Driving the vehicle in 2WD will have greater fuel economy benefits as the front axle is not engaged in 2WD.
 

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Lock on the Rebel is not a full 4-wheel lock. It's a lock in the B-W 44/45 transfer case to lock both front and rear differential, rather than an automatic clutch. It does work well, and if you have the LSD option, then you're even better off. It's not exactly the same as a 4-wheel lock, but as it is, it's still a very good trail and offroad system.

That said, I wouldn't run mine in 4wd in the rain, especially on faster roads.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
So I guess based on the guide the 4wd lock is the only option in the rain, or drive slower to keep wheel spin to a minimum in 2wd.
Thanks for your comments all.
 

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I have never driven any of my 4wd vehicles in 4wd for rain. Snow and offroad are the only reason I go into 4wd. That being said I don't always go into 4wd for snow and offroad but only when the conditions really need it. I try to stay in 2wd as much as I can, I figure it's less stress on the vehicle and better gpm's if that matters

Sent from my SM-N920V using Tapatalk
 

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It's also less wear on your tires. Especially the front ones. As you turn, travel distances for each tire shift. This causes tires to skip and chirp a bit on pavement, losing traction for a moment. At higher speeds on wet pavement, that can be just enough to cause the front end to break loose in a tight turn or lane change, such as when you're trying to avoid a car or an animal. It can also initiate a skid or even hydroplaning in the right circumstances.

Pavement is generally not the best place for 4WD unless it's got a lot of snow on it, and definitely not at highway speeds then. :)

Honestly, I've seen and helped a lot of guys in ditches along highways in trucks and SUVs in really bad weather. Most of them were driving too fast for conditions, thinking that a big vehicle got better traction than smaller vehicles. And a lot of them had 4WD engaged at the time. And most of them were trying to cruise at 60 and 70mph with packed snow on the roads, so they were changing lanes to go around slower traffic, too. A lot of things working against them. A bent frame or worse is a hard way to learn.
 

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I would NOT use 4WD for rain. if you're having traction issues some weight over the rear axle should handle it. 4x4 is for snowy roads or non-paved areas. Even then, 2WD will get you to most places you want anyway. Just make sure to find some dirt to engage the 4WD system every so often so things stay lubed
 

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Discussion Starter #9
After doing a bit more research on the 4wd system, I would have to agree with what most of you are saying. The 4wd Lock is not for rain. Unlike 4w High or AWD systems where the transfer case is not locked.

Thanks for all your comments.
 

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Just for clarification: 4WD High is locked on the Rebel, just like 4WD Low. Only difference is that 4WD Lo is geared down farther.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
So what I have found is that in the rain, I just need to ease off on the gas a bit, I'm not used to driving something with this much torque (last vehicle was crv, before that subaru outback) the posi seems to do quite well as long as I don't punch it.
 

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The other thing working against you is weight distribution. Pickup trucks are notoriously lightweight on the rear axle. It's always been like that. I had a '60 Chevy with a 6 cylinder in it that would act in the same fashion, although it was about half the weight and half the horsepower/torque. The weight is centered closer to the front axle, even with a crew cab.
 

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Why do we not have the 4WD High option on our Rebels? It seems like they could have included that...i just have a blank spot where that button would be.
 

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Gotcha. I looked in the manual and it shows 4WD Auto, a feature i do not have. I was confused and thought it said 4WD High.
 

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Gotcha. I looked in the manual and it shows 4WD Auto, a feature i do not have. I was confused and thought it said 4WD High.
The transfer case for 4wd auto is weaker and too bulky for the skid plate to fit over. The 44-45 that we have is much stronger and a better geared case.
 

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What RedRebel. I had the AWD system and the one we have is definitely better. You could Google and find a lot of people complaining about it...even videos showing why.
 

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Old thread, but a couple of clarifications should be made. The 44-45 case used in the Rebel is the same exact case as was used in older Dodge Ram 1500 trucks, say around vintage 2005. It is an electric shift on the fly system which has rear drive, 4-high, and 4-low. Once 4-high or 4-low are selected, the front and rear axles are mechanically locked together and must turn at the same speed.

The newer generation of RAM 1500 trucks use the 44-44 case, at least on the higher trim levels. The design and functionality is actually very similar. The difference is that the 44-44 uses a clutch at the front output shaft of the case. The clutch enables the "4-auto" mode. It also means that when you select 4-high or 4-low, there is no longer a mechanical connection between the front wheels and the engine's torque. Those modes simply cause the clutch to fully lock up and allow no slip. Of course, being a "clutch" it is possible slip could occur if you were operating in 4x4 in extreme conditions. Those conditions would almost certainly require you to be in 4-low for slip to ever occur. Installing oversize tires could also cause slip to occur.

That said, the clutch system offers a tremendous convenience for general 4x4 use in changing weather conditions. Pulling out of an unplowed snowy parking lot on to a plowed street might require engaging 4-high (4-lock) on the 44-45 (Rebel) case. As soon as the rear wheels came out of the snowy parking lot and all four wheels were on plowed pavement, binding would occur as you completed the turn. Meanwhile, a truck with the 44-44 case in 4-auto mode would pull out effortlessly.

I think the clutch based system has long proven to be reliable and convenient. GM and Ford use extremely similar designs. I'm not sure why this feature was removed from the Rebel. I guess if someone bought a brand-new Rebel and intended to pound it through deep mud every day or use it for rock crawling, the clutch-based system might wear out. But it is possible to have it both ways, apparently...the 2017 Ford Raptor has both a clutch-based 4-auto mode and mechanically-locked 4-hi and 4-low options. The Raptor case can even determine when the clutch-based AWD is being over-worked and automatically shift into 4-lock until the clutch cools down. That's a feature I'd like to see on the Rebel.

Clutch aside, the internals are no stronger on the 44-45 then they are on the 44-44 case. Anyone who has driven a good AWD vehicle in snow will certainly appreciate the total lack of binding while still supplying excellent traction in varying conditions. I'd actually like to see a 4-auto mode available on the HD trucks as well, but since none of the big three currently offer it, that's probably not going to happen for awhile.
 
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