Ram Rebel Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I posed the question over at Tundras.com and I will give equal time to the Ram side of things.

Shopping for used and my choices are down to either 2018 Tundra SR5 or 2019 Ram Rebel.

At the price point (31k) - I'm finding several Tundra double cabs and a few Rebel (mostly rental turn ins it feels like.

I look at the models like this:

Tundra: Pro reliability/brand rep, resale
Con: you get less "features", feels very middle aged focused.

Ram: Pro: sharper look. more features, value
Con: Reliability/brand rep, resale, looks like old man trying too hard.

As to the Ram - what I would go with is the hemi (nothing against a 6, but in trucks I just prefer 8 cylinder) - I'd prefer no etorque and looks like I'm limited to a 5" screen display (would prefer 8, but cannot find one...no way I'd ever do a 12").

So thoughts...good/bad - would you buy again and anything to look for?

I have read the 8 has a transmission made ny an outside maker (verus the 6 made by FCI under license) which is a positive. Hemis of course have their fanboys (I dont think of a modern 5.7 as either good or bad...its reliable, but alot of the marketing hype gets old).

I think the interior is nicer in a Ram - but could live with less badging/branding. If I'm driving it - I already probably signed the sales agreement - no need to remind me who makes the car. OTOH Toyota trucks have all the branding of a prison bus...drab and basic.

Can you change display/radio easily? Finding an 8" cant be that difficult recycled...any other features Ram has over Toyota these days?

As to my use..its not a daily driver. Its a weelend warrior. Passenger space is not a concern (I have a SUV for daily drives). 4WD is a must and it will be towing a boat and 16' trailer from time to time down at the farm. Tundra feels more "work ready" - but to get it on par with a Ram feature wise...I have to go to a Limited ($$) which means going older or higher price. Ram seems to slot in somewhere between basic work truck and real deal off roader.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
So I posed the question over at Tundras.com and I will give equal time to the Ram side of things.

Shopping for used and my choices are down to either 2018 Tundra SR5 or 2019 Ram Rebel.

At the price point (31k) - I'm finding several Tundra double cabs and a few Rebel (mostly rental turn ins it feels like.

I look at the models like this:

Tundra: Pro reliability/brand rep, resale
Con: you get less "features", feels very middle aged focused.

Ram: Pro: sharper look. more features, value
Con: Reliability/brand rep, resale, looks like old man trying too hard.

As to the Ram - what I would go with is the hemi (nothing against a 6, but in trucks I just prefer 8 cylinder) - I'd prefer no etorque and looks like I'm limited to a 5" screen display (would prefer 8, but cannot find one...no way I'd ever do a 12").

So thoughts...good/bad - would you buy again and anything to look for?

I have read the 8 has a transmission made ny an outside maker (verus the 6 made by FCI under license) which is a positive. Hemis of course have their fanboys (I dont think of a modern 5.7 as either good or bad...its reliable, but alot of the marketing hype gets old).

I think the interior is nicer in a Ram - but could live with less badging/branding. If I'm driving it - I already probably signed the sales agreement - no need to remind me who makes the car. OTOH Toyota trucks have all the branding of a prison bus...drab and basic.

Can you change display/radio easily? Finding an 8" cant be that difficult recycled...any other features Ram has over Toyota these days?

As to my use..its not a daily driver. Its a weelend warrior. Passenger space is not a concern (I have a SUV for daily drives). 4WD is a must and it will be towing a boat and 16' trailer from time to time down at the farm. Tundra feels more "work ready" - but to get it on par with a Ram feature wise...I have to go to a Limited ($$) which means going older or higher price. Ram seems to slot in somewhere between basic work truck and real deal off roader.

I honestly prefer the Rebel over the Tundra, although the Tundra's engine last longer. I would not get the air suspension if you live in the cold though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I honestly prefer the Rebel over the Tundra, although the Tundra's engine last longer. I would not get the air suspension if you live in the cold though.
I am really not going to say anything bad about the Tundra, but I had the exact same choice two months ago. Drove them both, and was just more impressed with the Ram. The Tundra has a great reputation, but for me the Ram just had the "it " factor. I've had my Rebel for a couple months now, and am so happy that I picked it. The interior is just so beautiful and relaxing. I love everything about this truck. I agree, with the air suspension comment, I stayed away from it. Good luck, I really don't think you can go wrong with either truck. I have the etorque and really like it. The Rebel has the 3.92, so the mileage is not going to be as good as the sticker says. That mileage is for the 5.7 in general, but the gearing can and does affect that. Many different claims on here. I get 14. something in town unless I get on it, and anywhere fro 15 to 18 on the highway depending on speed and hills.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Both great trucks but I am one of those guys who will only drive a Ford, Ram, GMC, Chevy. My 19 Ram is a great vehicle so far and it is as capable of a work truck as any truck made.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
I was a three time and loyal Toyota owner and traded my Tundra on a custom ordered and built for me, 2019 5.7 Hemi, Ram Rebel 12, Crew Cab with Ram Box, and four corner air suspension. I bought my Rebel new because as this point in my vehicle ownership life, I know what I need and want. The Tundra, while a capable truck it had cheap finishes and was quite basic for its high price tag. It was not without its own mechanical issues. Like the strewing rack that needed replacement at 400 miles, both rear axles that needed replacement at with under 10k miles, front end alignments every 5k miles, and so on... From the exterior, I loved the look. From the inside, it was just ok. The warranty service was great, but way too much time in the shop. I had driven through the C,J,D & R lot so many times and liked what I'd seen for years. When I saw the 2019 Rebel, I had to test drive it. I drove all three engine options. The one I felt was the best was the 5.7 Hemi no eTorque.
I took the plunge and factory ordered my ideal Rebel. It arrived at the dealership 8 weeks to the day from when I ordered it. Now, I know I got a some things you don't want, like the air suspension and the 12".UConnect. I live in NY, have been through 2 winters with the air suspension with no issues.
My opinion, the Rebel, soup to nuts far exceeds the Tundra.
Whichever you decide on, good luck and get what you want, need and like!
30530
D0BE94EB-B51C-44B2-AD80-E22CFA5B7D0C.jpeg
 

·
Registered
2020 Ram Rebel 4X4
Joined
·
65 Posts
I really enjoyed my Tundra; had a lot of great road trips and off-road adventures with it and never had an issue of any kind. I had the fully loaded, top of the line 1794 Edition (but I stripped off all the chrome).

Pros; solid truck, solid power/drive trains, powerful, lots of aftermarket, large back seat, less tech (so reliable), resale value! Looks fantastic modded out too!

Cons; nice but very outdated interior, limited interior storage, less tech, not as comfortable as most other top line models, gas mileage (truly sucks).









I finally decided for a change and modded up a 2018 Nissan Titan PRO 4X. Actually, a decent truck and very comfortable but aftermarket is very limited (and borrowed too many design elements from Ford and Ram to be honest). Got bored with it and decided I either wanted another new Tundra, new Raptor, or new Power Wagon or Rebel.





Feel in love the 2020 Ram Rebel as was second only to the Raptor in terms of interior comfort and overall performance but better looking and more comfortable interior, plus lots of aftermarket and the V8 sounds much better than the Raptor's Eco (but not as good as the Toyota's TRD). I am just getting started but think this is going to a fun truck to build







Edited; to answer the question if I would buy a Tundra again, the answer is "yes" and I almost did but the Toyota dealership was not very responsive when I wanted to talk numbers so I decided to spend a day looking at other trucks again; I ended up at the nearby Ram dealership and purchased my Rebel on sight. Too early to say if I will be happy with the Ram enough to buy another but I had no issues with my 2009 Laramie 1500 4x4, 2004 2500 Laramie Cummins 4x4, or 1994 Sport 1500 4x4 which is why Ram was on my radar to begin with.
 

·
Super Moderator
2020 Rebel Rambox
Joined
·
197 Posts
I won’t lie I’m a die hard Mopar guy, so I say ram all the way. My only thing is the questionable reliability debate between the two.
i don’t own any Toyota’s, but from the modern perspective I know of two close friends of mine that got rid of their new Toyota trucks, one had a lot of suspension and ride issues as well as horrible milage, the other complained quote, “for this kind of milage, my ram will spank it ten times into Sunday and still pull better.”
one of which is an automechanic, returned his tundra for a 17 dodge tradesman. Because in his expirience, that was the “golden year” which has the lowes equipment premature failure rate. He loved the interior of the tundra but relibility and milage was his issue.
In today’s world that’s a horse a piece, we won’t have a solid grasp on what’s reliable and what’s not till 20 years from now, and see what’s still on the road.
notice all the Chevy trailblazers that vanished? Pontiacs?The electrical gremlins alone were enough to make two of the most popular vehicles on the road vanish all at once.
and yet, Buick centuries are still floating around everywhere. Just wish Buick’s most reliable car wasn’t so god-awful ugly.
 

·
Registered
2020 Ram Rebel 4X4
Joined
·
65 Posts
I won’t lie I’m a die hard Mopar guy, so I say ram all the way. My only thing is the questionable reliability debate between the two.
i don’t own any Toyota’s, but from the modern perspective I know of two close friends of mine that got rid of their new Toyota trucks, one had a lot of suspension and ride issues as well as horrible milage, the other complained quote, “for this kind of milage, my ram will spank it ten times into Sunday and still pull better.”
one of which is an automechanic, returned his tundra for a 17 dodge tradesman. Because in his expirience, that was the “golden year” which has the lowes equipment premature failure rate. He loved the interior of the tundra but relibility and milage was his issue.
In today’s world that’s a horse a piece, we won’t have a solid grasp on what’s reliable and what’s not till 20 years from now, and see what’s still on the road.
notice all the Chevy trailblazers that vanished? Pontiacs?The electrical gremlins alone were enough to make two of the most popular vehicles on the road vanish all at once.
and yet, Buick centuries are still floating around everywhere. Just wish Buick’s most reliable car wasn’t so god-awful ugly.
So true, it really is a crapshoot most of the time as every single manufacturer and/or model has had its issues and there are definitely lemons out there across all of them. The Tundra is rated as one of the most reliable trucks out there but it does seem that more recent models have more issues (hard to say "newer" models with Toyota since the Tundra platform has been around since 2007...lol). But like I said, mine had "zero" issues over the 4 years I owned it (since new) as well as no recalls/issues for either of my 4Runners (one was brand new current Gen and I beat it up on the trails with no failures/issues and the other ran for almost 200K miles before I sold it). But I am sure that doesn't matter when your friend or anyone else has a problem so I can see wanting to dump something when it doesn't hold up mechanically. And the Tundra literally sucks on gas mileage...worse of the bunch!

However, my brand new 2020 Ram Rebel is only 9 weeks old and I already have (2) recalls from FCA that I have to address and my mileage is much worse that expected as I am averaging same City as my fully modded out and much heavier Tundra (and I don't even have any big mods done yet). My older Rams never had any. I think vehicles are just getting too complicated and therefore a lot more now goes wrong.

I hear you on the Buicks; I had a couple of them as well and the older (1972 Century Coupe) was a tank with a massive 455 V8 (gave my Tundra a run for the money on worst mileage but at least mine was heavily modded...lol). But of all the GMs, the Buicks were the ugliest for sure (sans some Pontiac misses).
 

·
Super Moderator
2020 Rebel Rambox
Joined
·
197 Posts
The big thing as far as recalls, they are getting pretty strict nowadays at forcing recalls. So anything new is gonna have its lot of them, mainly because ANYTHING safety related is free game. Gone are the days of the reliable and “almost” recall free 99 ram and what-not, but I digress.
mom averaging pretty good at 17-18 with 3.92 gears, which was actually very surprising. I’d be ok with 16 given I value power over economy. As far as it being a crap shoot, everything is. Older vehicles are easier to diagnose, as thousands of others have already had that problem. New, your always the Ginny pig, as it’s too young to have reliable data. I really think they make vehicles far better nowadays, but with every component adds a probability of failure. I really like the new Rams because they stepped up their game above the competition as far as features and comfort.
So far with mine I couldn’t be happier. All the minor annoyances I have is with Apple CarPlay. It works alright, but doesn’t have that smooth ease-of-use apple USED TO be known for. But I love it. I’m sure I’d like the new tundra too, I just think the ram has a lot more to offer. The classic series is still very popular and with good reason, it works. I live in dodge country without a dodge dealership. We have a ford and a Chevy dealership but dodge is still significantly more common. 2nd would be Chevy pickups and 3rd Toyota. I guess a lot of us up here like the aggressive appeal dodge offers.
 

·
Registered
2020 Ram Rebel 4X4
Joined
·
65 Posts
Totally agree that the new Rams offer a lot more than the current Tundra. I wish I had looked at my current Rebel sooner when I was thinking about going back to a Tundra as it is a shock going between the two vehicles on how old looking the Toyota interiors are getting (still nice considering it's a truck but Ram really has set a very high bar for everyone). Even the new Raptor I was considering doesn't marry up (although the Recaro seats are the best).

Don't get me wrong, I was only surprised about having (2) recalls already but you're dead-on about the [safety] scrutiny needed these days and fact that everything is so complicated. The Ram has been a dream truck for me to date and having a lot of fun modding it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
So I posed the question over at Tundras.com and I will give equal time to the Ram side of things.

Shopping for used and my choices are down to either 2018 Tundra SR5 or 2019 Ram Rebel.

At the price point (31k) - I'm finding several Tundra double cabs and a few Rebel (mostly rental turn ins it feels like.

I look at the models like this:

Tundra: Pro reliability/brand rep, resale
Con: you get less "features", feels very middle aged focused.

Ram: Pro: sharper look. more features, value
Con: Reliability/brand rep, resale, looks like old man trying too hard.

As to the Ram - what I would go with is the hemi (nothing against a 6, but in trucks I just prefer 8 cylinder) - I'd prefer no etorque and looks like I'm limited to a 5" screen display (would prefer 8, but cannot find one...no way I'd ever do a 12").

So thoughts...good/bad - would you buy again and anything to look for?

I have read the 8 has a transmission made ny an outside maker (verus the 6 made by FCI under license) which is a positive. Hemis of course have their fanboys (I dont think of a modern 5.7 as either good or bad...its reliable, but alot of the marketing hype gets old).

I think the interior is nicer in a Ram - but could live with less badging/branding. If I'm driving it - I already probably signed the sales agreement - no need to remind me who makes the car. OTOH Toyota trucks have all the branding of a prison bus...drab and basic.

Can you change display/radio easily? Finding an 8" cant be that difficult recycled...any other features Ram has over Toyota these days?

As to my use..its not a daily driver. Its a weelend warrior. Passenger space is not a concern (I have a SUV for daily drives). 4WD is a must and it will be towing a boat and 16' trailer from time to time down at the farm. Tundra feels more "work ready" - but to get it on par with a Ram feature wise...I have to go to a Limited ($$) which means going older or higher price. Ram seems to slot in somewhere between basic work truck and real deal off roader.
The Tundra is going to have nearly double the available fuel capacity with its standard 38 gallon fuel tank. Neither truck is likely to have an electronic locking differential as it is not available from Toyota and only as a package addition to the Ram. In terms of payload the Tundra will be greater and can be easily increased with Supersprings but the Ram with its coil springs is designed for comfort on the highway and not carrying payloads.

I would not discount the reliabilty factor. I have had 5 Toyota 4WD pickups that I used extensively off road and after more than 170,000 miles on each of them I never had a breakdown. I had water pumps and timing belts and clutches replaced as necessary but could always schedule the work at my convenience. On the reliability front if I do buy a 2021 Ram it will be with the V-8 without eTorque as when this unit fails it can mean the truck is down until it can be towed and repaired (when parts are available).

The Toyota pickups all come standard with parking and blind spot detection whereas with the Ram this is either an expensive option or requires buying much higher trim model. Same goes for the headlights on the Ram that are decidedly inferior unless you get a Laramie or higher trim level.

The Ram will have the better ride in terms of comfort but the Toyota will be the better value and the safer truck to drive unless you buy a used higher end Ram Laramie or Limited model.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
I Chose the Rebel even after knowing the reliability aspect of the Tundra. My buddy has an 09 that runs like a champ at 320k but he has had issues just like any other truck. Most of them were beyond the backyard fix, too. Hard to get to the external stuff on the motor for one example, forcing him to have to hire someone to do the work.

Mine has an electronic differential lock and the electronics are vastly better in the Ram. My 2016 Sport was very reliable despite having a bent axle [found out when the pinion bearing went out]. It was then I found out it had a bent frame in the accident that happened before I got it...that discovery led me to trade it in on the Rebel and buy my first new truck ever.

Very glad I chose the Ram over any other brand. I plan on buying a Chrysler Direct Warranty before the 36k mark that will carry me a full 7 years at unlimited mileage so I never have to worry about a thing.
 

·
Super Moderator
2020 Rebel Rambox
Joined
·
197 Posts
I’m born and raised a die hard dodge guy, so that’s that for me.
I’ve been driving beaters and fixed-uppers my whole life, after my wife got sick of me wrenching on my 82 ram mud truck/daily driver, she talked me into buying new.
I have little trust in the longevity of modern computers so I dropped $4000 on the lifetime bumper to bumper. (Mainly for the ETorque system and 12” screen)

tundra while a good reliable truck, I wouldn’t say it has anything over the dodge as far as reliability or longevity. That’s just a bus Toyota’s been riding on since those little yellow Toyota’s that never died. Their cars are another animal though, Toyota and Honda cars are ridiculously bulletproof.
All-in-all I really figured if dropping $30k+, I want what I want. So I got it loaded and with the rambox. The rambox is something I don’t think I’d want another truck without as of now. Virtually nothing is in my cab. I got my tie downs, pull ropes, jumper cables, some tools, and he’ll even an air compressor in my passenger side box.
my drivers side is for groceries and beer. 👍
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
I just bought new for the first time in all my 63 years. I will be buying the extended warranty before the 36k mark [which will come within one year of buying it, yeah I drive A LOT]. Wish the Lifetime was available still, but I understand I can get a 7 year unlimited mileage warranty. Got tired of working on my daily drivers and lost a good source for mechanic on things I can't do myself. Doesn't make sense not to have a warranty on all the technology running these trucks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
With one of the eTorque Ram engines I would want an extended warranty. Same goes for a truck with the air suspension. No reason though to pay for the extended warranty before the factory warranty expires.

I have spent a great deal of time doing my own work on my 4WD trucks (Willys, Dodge, Ford, Mazda, Toyota, and Chevy). What struck me about the Toyota 4WD trucks was how well shielded the suspension components and engine components were on a stock truck. More welded reinforcement points where more strength was needed on the Toyota trucks. After having put 170,000 miles on each of my 4 Toyota 4x4 trucks they all had no play in the steering wheel and no whine from the transmission and the shift lever had zero play and every single item from the electricals and dash and door knobs and interior lights and switches were all working perfectly when I sold the trucks. That was not the case with the Dodge, Ford, or Chevy trucks I have owned and even if it is a minor item it still means a trip to the dealer and losing half a day or more of my time. In the backcountry if traveling alone I did not have the need for a full tool box and lots of spares when going with the Toyota trucks.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top