Ram Rebel Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How's everyone's rebel handle in the snow? I figured it would be a pertinent question what with winter coming up. It's snowing up in the high country in CO, thinking about taking it up there and tooling around some before it hits down lower and I have to make it to work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
933 Posts
Mine handled exceptionally well in 3' and under last year. Just keep rolling and don't stop. Put it in 4x4, but not low. Keep the speed up.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Zorcist

·
Registered
Joined
·
933 Posts
Trunk Vehicle Car Auto part Automotive exterior
I carry a few items in the very back, so the equivalent of a couple sandbags yes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
933 Posts
I have tried it and a couple ppl wanted it back. It is a lot, some ppl use it for referencing tho.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
I put "tube sand" in the back for winter driving. Two over the wheel wells and two against the front of the box. It makes a huge difference in traction if you keep your bed empty. It's cheap and can be reused. I think four cost me $12 CND at Home Depot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,408 Posts
I put "tube sand" in the back for winter driving. Two over the wheel wells and two against the front of the box. It makes a huge difference in traction if you keep your bed empty. It's cheap and can be reused. I think four cost me $12 CND at Home Depot.
I've also done that for many years. On the farm we had wheel weights from old tractors. The best ones were usually just big 4' wide flat rings that weighed up to 400 lbs. We'd put those in the bed. But you need a chain hoist or a loader to get them in and out. I started using sandbags later. Tubes are easier to find around here. They weigh about 60-70 lbs and cost $5-6, so I usually get 6 to 8 of them.

The only problem with them is the materials is that the woven bags don't weather too well. If you don't have a need for the sand when the bag starts to fall apart, you can just spread it over your yard. I also keep a small bucket of it in the truck when it's icy out. If you do get stuck on ice, a few handfuls of sand can usually solve your problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
On the farm we had wheel weights from old tractors...
I hear ya. When I worked for a sewer and watermain company I used cast iron manhole covers.

The only problem with them is the materials is that the woven bags don't weather too well.
I used to use real sandbags from work but I don't work there anymore.
Mine now are sealed heavy plastic full of the usual crappy sand fill I'd not want to use for anything else. This will be their fourth year and only one is gun taped up on an end. If I needed the sand out of one I have a knife in the truck and more tape. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Never thought about needing the sand bags! I'll have to look into that!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,408 Posts
I hear ya. When I worked for a sewer and watermain company I used cast iron manhole covers.
Nice thing about the big iron is that it stays cold. So if you leave the truck parked outside, ice/snow in the bed freezes it solid to the bed. You'd have to have a head-on collision at 60mph+ to break them loose before spring. Sometimes the plastic tubes don't freeze so well. The sand gets wet inside and freezes up, but ice doesn't always stick to the bags so well, and the tubes can roll in a hard turn. I prefer the big metal, but it's not always handy, and it can be hell to get out solo without a hoist.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Something you have to be careful about is putting too much weight in the back in snow conditions because it causes suspension preload on the front axle. When you take weight off the front axle, it negatively changes your steering dynamics.

Sent from my SM-G920P using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,408 Posts
Centered on the axle. Any further forward they start loading the front wheels, and any further back, they can add pendulum effect. Although we're not really talking all that much weight. They're typically about 30-32" long, so they fit just fine centered along the wheel wells.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Has anyone tried to put snow chains on their Rebel? I tried to put Titan chains on (TC3229-SCAM) and they fit the tires but there wasn't enough clearance between the tire and the brake line on the back tires. I can't find any info from Ram, but this is a serious problem. We got 15 feet of snow (yes, feet!) In Mammoth Lakes, CA over the last 2 weeks and I definitely need chains for the steep and icy roads. Any suggestions will help. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,408 Posts
Sounds like you need to change offset. The stock wheels are +18mm. If you replace them, you might want to go to a -6mm or so offset. That would give you about 24mm extra space (about 1") behind the tires, as long as you don't go with a wider tire.

You could also just install spacers if you like the existing rims. Spacers will accomplish the same goal.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top