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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone I'm wondering why RAM recommends 55 psi in the front tires and 45 psi in the rear. Also can I just run 55 psi in both the front and rear for so called better gas mileage? Just wondering any info would be appreciated. I have had my Flame Red monotone Rebel for 10 months, and I LOVE this truck. I have owned several Rams in the past and have very good luck with them.
 

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I have only had my rebel for 3-4 weeks now so I'm not sure what's better but my dealer actually put 55psi in both front and rear tires. I asked if they could fix it because the truck suggest 45 in the rear and was told by them that 55 all around is best for higher gas mileage.

If anyone knows something different please let me know this is just what my dealer said.
 

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Ram calculates the load range for each axle and wheel for the truck, including extra forces from hitting potholes or offroading over rocks. They then use the tire manufacturer's load/inflation tables to determine what pressure to inflate the tires to, in this case about 2900 lbs load, which Toyo's tables point to 55psi for the front tires.

Ram recommends lower pressure on the rear tires, at 45psi, unless the truck has a big load or is towing. Then they recommend 55psi. You might get a small % better mileage if you're lucky, but you will get a slightly rougher ride and reduced traction in the rear because less tire is resting on the pavement. I don't like running higher than recommendations because of the traction issue. Especially on wet pavement.

There are some really long discussions from last fall and this spring, in one of the subforums, that are worth reading.

Also, there are lots of guys that will argue for higher or lower pressures. Most dealers are not engineers. They aren't working off the same sheet of music that Ram and Toyo are using.

But the tire manufacturers across the board make tires to varying specs, and they generate the same kind of load tables. And they ALL recommend that you follow the vehicle manufacturer's guidelines for proper inflation, if you are using the stock tire. If you switch to different tires, just use the inflation tables for the new tires.
 

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And yes, I've inflated my rears to 55psi a few times for hauling. The ride is definitely rougher until I reduce it again. And the rear end tends to skip a little more on bumps, and slip more on wet pavement.

Don't take this as gospel, try it yourself. I'm not the only person with opinions. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ram calculates the load range for each axle and wheel for the truck, including extra forces from hitting potholes or offroading over rocks. They then use the tire manufacturer's load/inflation tables to determine what pressure to inflate the tires to, in this case about 2900 lbs load, which Toyo's tables point to 55psi for the front tires.

Ram recommends lower pressure on the rear tires, at 45psi, unless the truck has a big load or is towing. Then they recommend 55psi. You might get a small % better mileage if you're lucky, but you will get a slightly rougher ride and reduced traction in the rear because less tire is resting on the pavement. I don't like running higher than recommendations because of the traction issue. Especially on wet pavement.

There are some really long discussions from last fall and this spring, in one of the subforums, that are worth reading.

Also, there are lots of guys that will argue for higher or lower pressures. Most dealers are not engineers. They aren't working off the same sheet of music that Ram and Toyo are using.

But the tire manufacturers across the board make tires to varying specs, and they generate the same kind of load tables. And they ALL recommend that you follow the vehicle manufacturer's guidelines for proper inflation, if you are using the stock tire. If you switch to different tires, just use the inflation tables for the new tires.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hey thanks for the info. I have been running 55/45. I was just wondering why. You answered my question. Thanks again. By the way, I am a old guy and just now getting the hang of this forum business. Lol MOPAR all the way.
 

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All four of mine were at 58 when I picked it up from the dealer, since then they are currently all at 55. I was confused when I saw the info on the door panel saying they should be at 45.
 

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It's so easy to find pressure gauges off a bit. Dealer might have set them all to 55, but had a bad gauge and actually set them higher. Also mine tend to run 2-3 degrees warmer when driving. I set them to 55/45 when cold, and after a couple minutes on the road the sensors will show them around 58/48.

BTW don't trust the truck's sensor units to be real accurate.

I bought a couple of brand new gauges last summer and already one of them is off by 20 lbs. Those were the cheaper long, thin gauges. I bought them just to stick in consoles for quick checks on the road.

The ones I like best are the standard round air gauges with a bleeder/release button. You can stick them on the valve, pull them off, and read them. Then press the bleeder to let the pressure out. These things last years, and I have a couple in the garage that I've had for about 20 years. They still read within 1psi of each other. Get the ones with better gauges in them, not the 1" super cheap $5 models. This Bell model (Amazon link here) is about $16. It's larger (2"), easier to read, and has marks for every 1 psi, or every 10kPa if you're Canadian.



Btw, the neighbor has 2 digital gauges and they disagree with each other by about 5psi. I think they're only a few years old.
 
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